Incident report locator

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How we collect and analyze reports

Generally speaking, observations or experiences thought to be related to bigfoot/sasquatch activity spark an intense interest on the part of witnesses. While it may take some individuals days or even years, eventually many seek information via the Internet, find the NAWAC, and submit a report. In other situations, friends or family refer some people to the NAWAC after they hear about the incident, while others send in their accounts after seeing a television program or newspaper/magazine article featuring NAWAC members. A fairly high percentage of reports come to the NAWAC via talks given by members to schools or civic organizations. After sharing their story, witnesses are encouraged to submit a report. Regardless of how the incident comes to be submitted, a NAWAC regional director assigns one or more investigators to assess the report and conduct an appropriate follow-up. Oftentimes this involves making contact with the witness and, if thought appropriate, visiting the incident location. After writing up and classifying the report, it may or may not be published to the NAWAC public database of reports, depending on a variety of factors. Submit a report...

About the classifications

Classifying reports is essentially a shorthand technique for differentiating between categories of incidents. Finding a possible footprint is obviously a different situation than a secretary glimpsing a large bipedal form running across a country road at night. A hunter observing a sasquatch through his binoculars in daylight is different than someone obtaining a photograph, and so on. In lieu of compelling physical evidence of some sort, one can never be 100% certain regarding the reliability of the information obtained through incident reports and the follow-up investigations. This is not an indictment on the integrity of witnesses or NAWAC investigators; it is merely acknowledging that certain reports can be considered more reliable than others. The number of witnesses, observer expertise, associated evidence, and investigator observations, all impact the subjective assessment of reliability. Classification details...

About the RSS feeds

RSS (Really Simple Syndication) is a family of information feed formats used to notify subscribers to updated content from web sites such as the NAWAC's. An RSS document, which contains either a summary of content or the full text, makes it possible for people to keep up with their favorite web sites in an automated manner. Users subscribe to a feed by clicking on the RSS icon in a browser that initiates the subscription process. The reader checks the user's subscribed feeds regularly for new content, downloading any updates. More about RSS...

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Class 1a
A sasquatch/bigfoot specimen has been collected (alive or dead).
Class 1b
A report investigation results in a sasquatch observation or the documentation of clear tracks or other forms of physical evidence by an investigator.
Class 1c
An investigator determines that a visual encounter with a sasquatch/bigfoot by a very reliable observer is a distinct possibility, tangible corroborating evidence is documented, and all other sources can be reasonably ruled out.
Class 1d
A visual encounter with a sasquatch/bigfoot is a distinct possibility involving two or more reliable observers, and all other sources can be reasonably ruled out.
Class 2
Investigator determines that a visual encounter with a sasquatch/bigfoot is a distinct possibility, the observer is exceptionally trustworthy, professionally trained, and experienced in the outdoors and/or is accustomed to looking for and recording details (e.g., biologist, anthropologist/archaeologist, ranger, trapper/tracker/seasoned hunter, bird watcher, game warden, naturalist, law enforcement), and other explanations can be reasonably excluded.
Class 3a
Investigator determines that a visual encounter with a sasquatch/bigfoot is a distinct possibility, the observer is credible, and all other sources can be reasonably ruled out.
Class 3b
Unidentifiable vocalizations were reported and there is accompanying tangible evidence to possibly indicate the presence of a sasquatch/bigfoot, the observer is very reliable, and other sources can be reasonably ruled out.
Class 3c
No visual encounter occurred, but physical evidence was found to indicate the presence of a sasquatch/bigfoot (tracks, hair, scat, etc.), the observer is very reliable, and other sources can be reasonably ruled out.